Racing the Devil, by Charles Todd

Racing the Devil is the nineteenth book in the Inspector Ian Rutledge Mystery Series and a tantalizing read. Like many previous Rutledge Mysteries, in Race with the Devil, the Inspector chases after a mass murderer who attacks anyone who obstructs his or her dark ambitions. Targets include Rutledge.

THE PLOT

Seven British Army officers pledge to meet in Paris, a year after the eventual conclusion of the Great War. The five who survive the trenches find that their battles continue after the Armistice. Someone, perhaps one of the five, tries to kill the others.

A year after the Paris reunion, a motorcar belonging to one of the five crashes in a Sussex village near the lime cliffs known as the Seven Sisters, killing the driver. The local constable calls “The Yard” for assistance. Enter, Inspector Rutledge.

The novel’s subtext speaks of the wreckage left in the wake of war—depopulation, especially among the best and brightest of the young men; grotesque physical and emotional wounds among the survivors, and the remains of their families; and the rusting remnant of the nation’s infrastructure. So many horses die in the war that unemployed blacksmiths turn their smithies into automobile repair shops—a salient detail in a story focused on cars and “accidents.”

Rutledge fans will notice a diminished role for Hamish Macleod. Hamish stars in his own, recent short story: The Piper, but his scarcity may say more about Rutledge’s long-term health than anything else.

THE SERIES

Charles Todd offers his readers, in addition to a tense, absorbing mystery, a travelogue of Southeast England, circa 1920, a prose rich in imagery, and period references. The reader would be wise to consult a detailed roadmap of the United Kingdom to follow the action. Online searches for images of the local landscape and geological features can add perspective.

Todd’s time machine douses readers with frequent rain, guides them through the tents and booths of market days, feeds them sandwiches, cakes, and pub fare, and nearly drowns them in tea, whiskey, port, and the ever-looming pint. Todd reanimates regional traditions and institutions such as the town constable. Rutledge encounters an assortment of local policemen and learns the value of those who have served long and well. They know everyone in and everything that happens on their patch. Then, there are the others who guard their turf and milk it for any benefit it may bring to themselves.

A master craftsman, Charles Todd can be counted on to ratchet up the level of suspense and conflict. He leads his readers on a merry chase by introducing squads of characters with means, motive, and opportunity. Just when the guilty individual seems to have been arrested, Todd saves another major wrinkle to unfold.

Race with the Devil is never boring. It’s the type of story where the readers may glance at the clock to realize that Todd has kept him or her up beyond the normal bedtime hour. The only regret is that fans must wait another year for volume twenty.

The Piper: An Inspector Ian Rutledge Story, by Charles Todd

The Piper: An Inspector Ian Rutledge Story by [Todd, Charles]

Charles Todd’s Inspector Ian Rutledge Mystery Series guides readers across early twentieth-century London, the English countryside, and occasionally on trips to the continent.  Readers observe as Scotland Yard’s ace investigator solves the cases everyone else finds impossible. Wherever Rutledge goes, Hamish MacLeod is sure to follow. Normally, Todd offers Rutledge mystery as novels. However, The Piper presents as a short story, and Rutledge is totally missing. In The Piper, Hamish MacLeod becomes a sleuth long before he meets the Scotland Yard Inspector. After Hamish rescues an injured bagpiper, the same lad is found murdered near the MacLeod croft. Hamish uses guile to trap the killer but exposes himself to considerable danger.

Weaving short stories into the fabric of a novel-based series conveniently fills in backstory and deepens character-development. Short stories may link to earlier and future works in serial novels, cement over gaps between existing novels, or offer a second viewpoint on the events.

Some of Charles Todd’s more recent Ian Rutledge novels serve as prequels to the post-World War I series. Although the author adds a new book each year, his pre-war short story—The Piper—both satisfies and intensifies the impatient fans’ hunger for a morsel of vicarious adventure.

The Piper elaborates on Hamish’s personal life and character. It illuminates the forces that shape the rugged individualism and moral strength he exhibits throughout the Rutledge series—the same courage that brings him into conflict with Rutledge.

Although remarkably beautiful, the Highlands of Scotland can challenge both beast and man. The MacLeod sheep survive outdoors on sparse vegetation, despite cold, soaking rain and raging wind. The canny highland sheep know how to hunker down behind any structure that blocks the wind. They provide Hamish’s family with the finest wool, the foundation of their subsistence. As The Piper begins, the reader observes Hamish struggling against the wind and drenching rain to open the door of his stone cottage. Without any luxuries, he roots about in the dark to stoke his fire and brighten his shelter. When he manages to find dry clothing, he hears a call for help. He returns to the storm to find a badly injured lad who he carries back to his home. These behaviors play out again in the later books of the series when Corporal Hamish MacLeod serves under the command of Ian Rutledge in the trenches of the Somme.

Ann McIntyre, a member of the Catholic Writers Guild, also uses a short story (Yes) as a link between her published novels set in the past (Lazarus of Bethany and The Feast of Pontius Pilate) to a novel in progress, set in the present. Other Guild members may find that short stories aid in rounding out their novels.